Luck and Zealots

The damned Zealots of the All-Seeing-Eye had been chasing me for three days when things finally came to an end. That last day had been all mad dash through jungle too. I’d played one little game of chance, in one of their temples, and they wanted me dead. Stupid of me to think I could be sneaky about it. In a Temple of the All-Seeing-Eye. It’s right there in the name. A little harsh on the reaction though. As I ran that last day I fully gave myself to Luck. To my Goddess of Chance. I rattled the dice in my hand as I ran, and I prayed. She was always my protector in my mind. I always prayed to her, only her, since I knew there were Gods and we could pray to them. So as I suddenly burst out of jungle cover onto a cliff edge, I kept running, kept praying. As my feet no longer touched ground beneath, them I threw the dice one more time. Left my fate to Fate. Seems Zealots of the All-Seeing-Eye don’t get to see their own demise in order to prevent it. While Luck, she works in mysterious ways, so can I live to tell her story.

A Near Failure

Earl the Delivery Sheep was normally very laid back regarding his work, so long as he got his package to its destination both intact and on time. He was informal with his boss, lax with his uniform, and near forgetful with safety practices. That day was different. That day he needed his uniform to clearly announce who he was and why he was knocking. That day he would carry the garlic, and the screeching lemmings. In fact, as he left, he made sure to grab extra screeching lemmings before he logged out the package for delivery. He was mostly calm passing through the Vale of Shroudedness, along the Path of Awkward Dreams trying make the delivery. He hesitated before crossing the drawbridge over the moat of popcorning guinea pigs. With reluctance he knocked upon the door of Count Gary Von Pronghorn the 3rd, and tried not to run away. However, as the door began to open, Earl panicked. He threw down the package along with several screeching lemmings, before fleeing in terror. He never forgave himself for wetting his wool that day.